[{"id":25,"title":"COVID-19 Deadline Update","date":"Aug 25, 2020","author":"TCP","category":"News","image":"img/sample-news.png","description":"COVID-19 Deadline Update","content":"\n\t\n\t\n\t\n\n

In response to COVID-19, the decision has been made to delay the submission deadline for Phase 2 of the CO~2~ Conversion Challenge. Please note the following:

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If you have any question about these changes, please contact us at solutions@co2conversionchallenge.org.

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CO~2~ Conversion Challenge Team

\n\n\t\n"},{"id":22,"title":"COVID-19: Deadline Update","date":"Apr 09, 2020","author":"TCP","category":"News","image":"img/sample-news.png","description":"COVID-19: Deadline Update","content":"\n\t\n\t\n\t\n\n

In response to COVID-19, the decision has been made to delay the submission deadline for Phase 2 of the CO2 Conversion Challenge. Please note the following:

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If you have any question about these changes, please contact us at solutions@co2conversionchallenge.org.

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CO2 Conversion Challenge Team

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\n\n\n\t\n"},{"id":21,"title":"COVID-19 Announcement","date":"Mar 19, 2020","author":"TCP","category":"News","image":"img/sample-news.png","description":"COVID-19 Announcement","content":"\n\t\n\t\n\t\n\nAs the coronavirus (COVID-19) situation evolves, NASA and the Centennial Challenges team want to assure you that we continue to monitor information daily and consider additional appropriate actions to take in the best interest of our teams. We are currently evaluating options to minimize the impact on the CO₂ Conversion Challenge. We will continue to keep you updated as we learn more. Thank you for your support and patience.\n\n\t\n"},{"id":20,"title":"VIDEO: CO₂ Challenge Phase 2 Webinar","date":"Mar 02, 2020","author":"TCP","category":"News","image":"img/sample-news.png","description":"View our latest webinar with registered Phase 2 participants","content":"\n\t\n\t\n\t\n\nView our latest webinar with registered Phase 2 participants in the CO₂ Challenge.\n\n\t\n"},{"id":12,"title":"NASA seeks CO₂ conversion solutions for future Mars outpost","date":"Oct 09, 2019","author":"Greenbiz","category":"News","image":"image/news/greenbiz.jpg","description":"As NASA readies for Artemis missions to the Moon, the agency and its partners are also paving the way for long-term exploration of the Red Planet.","content":"\n\t\n\t\n\n

GreenBiz writes:

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In space, every molecule potentially plays a role in human exploration — even the carbon dioxide prevalent in the atmosphere of Mars. In the future, with help from citizen scientists, those carbon dioxide molecules could help deliver a wealth of products essential for living and working on Mars.

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As NASA readies for Artemis missions to the Moon, the agency and its partners are also paving the way for long-term exploration of the Red Planet by seeking innovative solutions for converting the carbon dioxide from Mars’ atmosphere to sugars using non-biological technologies. These sugars then can be used to \"feed\" sophisticated microbial bioreactors to biomanufacture a wide array of mission-essential products such as foods, nutrients, medicine, polymers and fuels.

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It’s a natural solution, given the prevalence of the major necessary atoms — carbon, oxygen and hydrogen — in the atmosphere and potential surface water of Mars.

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Now, NASA’s CO₂ Conversion Challenge, part of the agency’s Centennial Challenges, is inviting independent researchers and teams from academia, industry and the public to develop new technologies for rapidly converting CO₂ into useful sugar molecules such as glucose.

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Read Full Article Here

\n\n\t\n"},{"id":10,"title":"Carbon Dioxide Conversion Challenge Could Help Human Explorers Live on Mars","date":"Sep 19, 2019","author":"NASA","category":"News","image":"img/sample-news.png","description":"Phase 2 of NASA’s CO2 Conversion Challenge invites the public, academia and industry to build a system that demonstrates the conversion of CO2 in combination with hydrogen to produce simple sugar molecules","content":"\n\t\n\t\n\n

Nasa writes:

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On Earth, plants convert carbon dioxide (CO2) into carbohydrates and oxygen – food for them and oxygen for us to breathe. There aren’t plants on Mars, but there is a lot of CO2. Technology that takes abundant resources, like CO found on the Red Planet, and turns them into useful supplies for human explorers could be key to long-term missions on Mars.

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Phase 2 of NASA’s CO2 Conversion Challenge invites the public, academia and industry to build a system that demonstrates the conversion of CO2 in combination with hydrogen – without the use of plants – to produce simple sugar molecules known as D-sugars. A “sweet” and successful demonstration will earn up to three top teams a portion of $750,000.

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The ability to make D-sugars such as glucose in space could fuel bioreactors filled with microorganisms. These systems could rapidly convert sugar into valuable mission products, including nutrients, fuel, adhesives and other materials.

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During Phase 1 of the competition, teams from across the country submitted system designs, provided information on how the conversion would occur, and explained how their system would work in space. Submissions also provided fabrication and testing plans. In May 2019, NASA awarded five teams a total of $250,000. Phase 2, the demonstration phase of the competition, will award up to three teams from a prize purse of $750,000, for a total challenge prize purse of $1 million. Participation in Phase 1 is not required to participate in Phase 2.

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Read Full Article Here

\n\n\n\n\t\n"},{"id":11,"title":"Tweet: CO₂ Challenge could help find a way to use the planet's atmosphere for fuel, food, meds & more","date":"Sep 19, 2019","author":"Jim Bridenstine","category":"News","image":"img/sample-news.png","description":"NASA's Jim Bridenstine comments on the CO₂ Challenge","content":"\n\t\n\t\n\t\n\n

NASA Administrator, Jim Bridenstine tweeted on September 19, bringing attention to the goal of the CO₂ Conversion Challenge:

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\"We're keeping an eye on tech needed for the next giant leap—sending humans to Mars. @NASAPrize’s Carbon Dioxide Conversion Challenge could help find a way to use the planet's atmosphere for fuel, food, meds & other products.\"

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See Full Tweet

\n\n\t\n"},{"id":9,"title":"Meet the Winners!","date":"May 17, 2019","author":"CO2 Conversion Challenge","category":"News","image":"img/sample-news.png","description":"Introducing NASA CO₂ Conversion Challenge Phase 1 Results","content":"\n\t\n\t\n\t\n\n

NASA has named five Phase 1 winners. Each winner will be awarded $50,000 each to build a functioning system according to their submitted proposals.

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To learn more about the winners, view the Meet the Winners page.

\n\n\t\n"},{"id":7,"title":"View Our Recent Participant Q&A Webinar","date":"Feb 15, 2019","author":"CO2 Conversion Challenge","category":"News","image":"img/sample-news.png","description":"Webinar participants asked questions and learn more about the CO₂ Conversion Challenge.","content":"\n\t\n\t\n\t\n\n

CO₂ Conversion Challenge: Participant Q&A Webinar \n
\n Fri, Feb 15, 2019

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View the recorded webinar here:  
https://youtu.be/lX3FqAZLo3g

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If you have any further questions about the challenge,
please email questions@co2conversionchallenge.org.

\n\n\t\n"},{"id":2,"title":"NASA launches $1 million competition for Mars project","date":"Sep 05, 2018","author":"Global Engineering News","category":"News","image":"image/news/globalengineeringnews.jpg","description":"If you think you're smart enough to figure out NASA's CO₂ problem, head over to the CO₂ Conversion Challenge website for more details.","content":"\n\t\n\t\n\t\n\n

Global Engineering News reports:

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Calling it the \"CO₂ Conversion Challenge\", NASA scientists say they need help finding a way to turn a plentiful resource like carbon dioxide into a variety of useful products in order to make trips to Mars possible.

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Carbon dioxide is one resource readily abundant within the martian atmosphere. If you think you're smart enough to figure out NASA's CO₂ problem, head over to the CO₂ Conversion Challenge website for more details and guidelines and to register. \"We have to get creative\".

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The contest is divided into two phases.

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\"Enabling sustained human life on another planet will require a great deal of resources and we can not possibly bring everything we will need, said program manager Monsi Roman in a press release\".

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Read Full Article

\n\n\t\n"},{"id":3,"title":"NASA opens $1 million public contest to turn carbon dioxide into sugar on Mars","date":"Sep 05, 2018","author":"ABC News","category":"News","image":"img/sample-news.png","description":"NASA is asking the public to figure out a way to turn carbon dioxide into glucose. The catch is, it needs to happen on Mars.","content":"\n\t\n\t\n\n

ABC News reports:

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Even rocket scientists can use a little help sometimes.

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NASA is asking the public to figure out a way to turn carbon dioxide into glucose. The catch is, it needs to happen on Mars.

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If the job sounds daunting, it is. But anyone who does it could take home part of a $1 million prize pot from NASA.

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\"Enabling sustained human life on another planet will require a great deal of resources and we cannot possibly bring everything we will need. We have to get creative,\" Monsi Roman, program manager of NASA’s Centennial Challenges program, said in a statement announcing the challenge last week. \"If we can transform an existing and plentiful resource like carbon dioxide into a variety of useful products, the space –- and terrestrial -- applications are endless.\"

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The competition comes from several goals the space agency has for both Mars and Earth.

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\"We're asking the public to help us convert carbon dioxide into sugar and the end game is gluclose,\" Roman told ABC News. \"That conversion happens naturally in photosynthesis on Earth all the time. It’s an issue on Mars. There’s a lot of carbon dioxide, if we have hydrogen, we can basically make 'designer farms.'\"

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Read Full Article

\n\n\t\n"},{"id":8,"title":"NASA's $1 Million Mars-Settling Challenge: Turn CO₂ into Sugar","date":"Sep 05, 2018","author":"Space.com","category":"News","image":"image/news/spacecom.jpeg","description":"If you know your way around a chemistry lab, you could help humanity set up shop on Mars — and make some serious cash in the process.","content":"\n\t\n\t\n\t\n\n

Space.com reports:

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If you know your way around a chemistry lab, you could help humanity set up shop on Mars — and make some serious cash in the process.

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NASA is challenging people throughout the United States to come up with a new and efficient way to convert carbon dioxide into glucose, a simple sugar. CO₂ dominates the thin atmosphere of Mars, and energy-rich glucose is a great fuel for microbe-milking \"bioreactors\" that could manufacture a variety of items for future settlers of the Red Planet, NASA officials said.

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\"Enabling sustained human life on another planet will require a great deal of resources, and we cannot possibly bring everything we will need. We have to get creative,” said Monsi Roman, program manager of NASA's Centennial Challenges program, which is running the new $1 million \"CO₂ Conversion Challenge.\"

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\"If we can transform an existing and plentiful resource like carbon dioxide into a variety of useful products, the space — and terrestrial — applications are endless,\" Roman said in a NASA statement.

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The new competition consists of two phases. During Phase 1, applicants submit a detailed description of their CO₂-to-glucose conversion system. Interested parties must register by Jan. 24, 2019 and submit their proposals by Feb. 28, 2019. 

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See Full Article

\n\n\t\n"},{"id":6,"title":"NASA launches $1 million competition for Mars project","date":"Sep 04, 2018","author":"New York Post","category":"News","image":"image/news/newyorkpost.jpg","description":"Dubbed the “CO₂ Conversion Challenge,” the space agency is looking for scientists to figure out how to transform the carbon dioxide that’s abundant on the Red Planet into glucose.","content":"\n\t\n\t\n\n

New York Post reports:

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NASA is offering $1 million in a new type of space race — to convert carbon dioxide into other compounds that can potentially be used to sustain life on Mars.

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Dubbed the “CO₂ Conversion Challenge,” the space agency is looking for scientists to figure out how to transform the carbon dioxide that’s abundant on the Red Planet into glucose.

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“Enabling sustained human life on another planet will require a great deal of resources and we cannot possibly bring everything we will need. We have to get creative,” said Monsi Roman, program manager of NASA’s Centennial Challenges program. “If we can transform an existing and plentiful resource like carbon dioxide into a variety of useful products, the space – and terrestrial – applications are endless.”

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Carbon, oxygen and hydrogen molecules are the building blocks of sugars, which NASA said “are preferred microbial energy sources” because they’re easy to metabolize.

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Read Full Article

\n\n\t\n"},{"id":5,"title":"NASA Launches $1M Competition to Turn Mars CO₂ into Sugar","date":"Sep 04, 2018","author":"Newsweek","category":"News","image":"image/news/newsweek.png","description":"When you’re an astronaut exploring Mars, you can’t just knock on your neighbor’s door to ask for a bowl of sugar...","content":"\n\t\n\t\n\n

Newsweek reports:

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When you’re an astronaut exploring Mars, you can’t just knock on your neighbor’s door to ask for a bowl of sugar. So NASA has challenged scientists and inventors to dream up ways of turning carbon dioxide into useful molecules, like glucose, to help those who will one day head to the Red Planet. 

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To win NASA's CO₂ Conversion Challenge, the team or individual must show how the gas could be used to create other compounds, with a potential total prize of $1m.

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On a spacecraft, room for cargo is scarce and the crew must prioritize the bare essentials. Astronauts are also short on resources like the time, water and energy needed to replicate the process through which plants make sugar-based biomaterials, which we take for granted here on Earth.

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Read Full Article

\n\n\t\n"},{"id":5,"title":"NASA Will Give You $750,000 if You Can Solve Their Mars CO₂ Problem","date":"Sep 04, 2018","author":"Outer Places","category":"News","image":"image/news/outerplaces.png","description":"If and when humankind finally reaches Mars and begins the process of building a colony, we're going to need a few a things...","content":"\n\t\n\t\n\n

Outer Places reports:

If and when humankind finally reaches Mars and begins the process of building a colony, we're going to need a few a things. Astronauts chosen for NASA's Mars Mission will have lots of supplies with them to make transitioning to life in a new world easier, but as with every settlement in history, they will also have to make use of native resources for long-term survival. According to Yahoo!, NASA needs some help in that department, and they have $1,000,000 in prize money waiting for the person/people that can figure out ways to turn carbon dioxide into other useful products, namely sugar.

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Read Full Article

\n\n\t\n"},{"id":1,"title":"New NASA Competition Aims to Convert Carbon Dioxide into Exploration Sweet Success ","date":"Aug 30, 2018","author":"Author","category":"News","image":"img/sample-news.png","description":"The CO₂ Conversion Challenge aims to help find a solution. Energy rich sugars are preferred microbial energy sources composed of carbon, hydrogen and oxygen atoms.","content":"\n\t\n\t\n\t\n\n

When astronauts begin exploring Mars, they’ll need to use local resources, freeing up launch cargo space for other mission-critical supplies. Carbon dioxide is one resource readily abundant within the Martian atmosphere. NASA’s new CO2 Conversion Challenge, conducted under the Centennial Challenges program, is a public competition seeking novel ways to convert carbon dioxide into useful compounds. Such technologies will allow us to manufacture products using local, indigenous resources on Mars, and can also be implemented on Earth by using both waste and atmospheric carbon dioxide as a resource. 

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“Enabling sustained human life on another planet will require a great deal of resources and we cannot possibly bring everything we will need. We have to get creative.” said Monsi Roman, program manager of NASA’s Centennial Challenges program. “If we can transform an existing and plentiful resource like carbon dioxide into a variety of useful products, the space – and terrestrial – applications are endless.”

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Carbon and oxygen are the molecular building blocks of sugars. Developing efficient systems that can produce glucose from carbon dioxide will help advance the emerging field of biomanufacturing technology on Earth.

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While sugar-based biomaterials are inexpensively made on Earth by plants, this approach cannot be easily adapted for space missions because of limited resources such as energy, water and crew time. The CO2 Conversion Challenge aims to help find a solution. Energy rich sugars are preferred microbial energy sources composed of carbon, hydrogen and oxygen atoms. They could be used as the feedstock for systems that can efficiently produce a variety of items. Glucose is the target sugar product in this challenge because it is the easiest to metabolize, which will optimize conversion efficiency. 

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The competition is divided into two phases. During Phase 1, teams must submit a design and description of a conversion system that includes details of the physical-chemical approaches to convert carbon dioxide into glucose. NASA will award up to five teams $50,000 each, to be announced in April 2019. Phase 2, the system construction and demonstration stage, is contingent on promising submissions in Phase 1 that offer a viable approach to achieving challenge goals. Phase 2 will carry a prize purse of up to $750,000, for a total challenge prize purse of $1 million. 

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The Centennial Challenges program, part of NASA’s Space Technology Mission Directorate, bridges the innovation gap between NASA and the nation by stimulating research and technology solutions inside and outside of the traditional aerospace community. The program offers incentive prizes to generate revolutionary solutions to problems of interest to NASA and the nation. Centennial Challenges is managed at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama.

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Shannon Ridinger
Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Ala.
256-544-0034
shannon.j.ridinger@nasa.gov

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